Photo Gallery - Harry Callahan

“Harry Callahan (1912-1999) is regarded as one of the most innovative and influential artists in the history of 20th-century US photography. Deichtorhallen Hamburg is taking the artist’s creative intensity, the aesthetic standing his oeuvre enjoys in the context of 20th-century US photography and the fact that 2012 marked the 100th anniversary of his birth as an opportunity to present his oeuvre in an extensive retrospective with over 280 works from March 22 through June 9, 2013. The exhibition is to date the most extensive show of his work, and includes both his black-and-white gelatin silver prints and his color works produced using the dye-transfer process.Harry Callahan was one of the first to overcome the prevailing aesthetics of Realism by advancing the New Vision, which László Moholy-Nagy had established in the New Bauhaus in Chicago, and Ansel Adams’ so-called “straight photography” in an innovative, highly sensitive way. Between 1946 and 1997 the Museum of Modern Art in New York alone honored Callahan’s photographic oeuvre in a total of 38 exhibitions. Together with the painter Richard Diebenkorn, Callahan represented the USA at the 1978 Venice Biennale, the first photographer ever to do so. Nonetheless, in Europe Callahan’s multifaceted work is still considered a rarity in the history of photography.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Surrealism Leon Bellefleur

«Leon Bellefleur was born in Montreal on february 8, 1910. His father objected to his desire to study at Beaux Arts. After graduating from École normale Jacques-Cartier, he starts his career as a school teacher which will last for twenty-five years. He marries Rita Jolicoeur in 1934. They have five children together.
He starts making drawings before he is ten years old. Eventually, he goes into painting. In 1946, he holds his first exhibition presented along with the drawings of the children he is teaching to. The following year, he publishes „Plaidoyer pour l'Enfant“. (Plea in favour of children).
In 1951, he wins the first prize for modern painting at the Spring Exhibition of the Fine Arts Museum of Montreal. He previouly held an exhibition at The Agnès Lefort Gallery. He also participated in a collective exhibition of young artists in Europe and to the Sao Paulo Biennial.»


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Images - Mila Smagliy

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yannima Tommy Watson - Australian artist, of the Pitjantjatjara people

Yannima Tommy Watson known as Tommy Watson (born 1930) is an Indigenous Australian artist, of the Pitjantjatjara people from Australia’s central western desert. He has been described by one critic as «the greatest living painter of the Western Desert»Tommy Yannima Pikarli Watson is a senior Pitjantjatara elder and Law man of Karima skin group. He was born around 1935 in Anumarapiti, 75 kilometers west of Irrunytju, also known as Wingellina, in Western Australia, near the junction of its border with the Northern Territory and South Australia. His given names of Yannima and Pikarli relate to specific sites near Anumarapiti. Watson's mother died during his infancy, and his father when he was about eight years old. He subsequently went to live with his father's brother, who himself died two years later. Tommy was then adopted by Nicodemus Watson, his father's first cousin. It was at this point that he went to live at Ernabella Mission, and adopted the surname Watson in addition to his Aboriginal birth name, thus becoming Tommy Yannima Pikarli Watson.
Nicodemus Watson became a strong father figure. Together they traveled widely, and Watson learned the traditional skills required to lead a nomadic existence in the desert, including the fashioning of tools and weapons from trees using burning coals, how and what to hunt, and how and where to find water. Under Nicodemus Watson's guidance, Watson learned about nature and his people's ancestral stories, collectively known to the Aboriginal peoples of Australia as Tjukurrpa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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American abstract expresionism Michael Goldberg

Michael Goldberg (December 24, 1924 – December 31, 2007) was an American abstract expressionist painter and teacher known for his gestural action paintings, abstractions and still-life paintings. A retrospective show, «Abstaction Over Time: The Paintings of Michael Goldberg», is showing at MOCA Jacksonville in Florida from 9/21/13 to 1/5/14. His work was seen in September 2007 in a solo exhibition at Knoedler & Company in New York City, as well as several exhibitions at Manny Silverman Gallery in Los Angeles. Additionally, a survey of Goldberg's work is exhibited at the University Art Museum at California State University, Long Beach since September 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ulysses Davis - American Folk Art

«Ulysses Davis (1914–1990) was a Savannah, Georgia, barber who created a diverse but unified body of highly refined sculpture that reflects his deep faith, humor, and dignity. His carvings were featured in the seminal 1982 exhibition “Black Folk Art in America, 1930–1980” at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., where they were applauded as important examples of African American vernacular art. Because he wanted his work to stay together after he died, Davis rarely sold his sculptures. He said, “They’re my treasure. If I sold these, I’d be really poor.” As a result, the carvings have had little exposure outside Savannah, particularly since his death, and Davis is little known outside folk art circles. In 1988, Davis received a Georgia Governor’s Award in the Arts.
For the more than three hundred carved wooden figures, furniture pieces, and reliefs he created during his lifetime, Davis used shipyard lumber, pieces donated by his friends, or wood he bought at lumberyards. He almost never made preliminary drawings or models but reduced the mass with a hatchet (and, later, a band saw) before refining the form with a chisel and knives, many of which he fabricated himself. To add textural detail, he sometimes used tools of this barbering trade, such as the blade of his hair clippers. Davis’s sculptures, which range in height from six to more than forty inches, can be divided into major categories: portraits of American and African leaders, religious images, patriotism, works influenced by African forms, fantasy, flora and fauna, love, humor, and abstract decorative objects. The exhibition includes the group regarded as the artist’s masterwork: a series of carved busts of forty U.S. presidents.»

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jenny Hunter Groat - abstract art

  "  Though I am completely able to make representational art, I prefer to paint abstractions because of its ability to convey worlds of meaning, feeling, and poetry beyond words or descriptions. I consider myself a 2nd Generation Abstract-Expressionist, since I was living, as a young Modern Dancer, in the 1950’s San Francisco, at the height of that great art movement, and my aesthetic impressions and ways of working were formed at that time. I had two other full art lives: 19 years as a pioneering modern dance performer/choreographer, then as an internationally known artist in fine art, western calligraphy. My return to full-time painting in these past years has been a synthesis of these earlier fields, based in the early Abstractionist years in San Francisco."


  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Josepha Petrick Kemarre - Australian artist from Central Australia

Josepha Petrick Kemarre (born ca. 1945 or ca. 1953, date uncertain) is an Anmatyerre-speaking Indigenous Australian artist from Central Australia. Since first taking up painting around 1990, her works of contemporary Indigenous Australian art have been acquired by several major collections including Artbank and the National Gallery of Victoria. Her paintings portray bush plum «dreaming» and women’s ceremonies (known as Awelye). One of her paintings sold at a charity auction for A$22,800. Josepha Petrick's works are strongly coloured and formalist in composition and regularly appear at commercial art auctions in Australia. Her art appears to have survived the huge contraction of the primary art market in Australia since 2008. There is no existing Catalogue raisonné of Josepha Petrick's artworks, to date, no fakes have been cited.Josepha Petrick Kemarre is an Anmatyerre-speaking Indigenous Australian, born around 1945 or 1953 at the Santa Teresa Mission, near Alice Springs in Australia's Northern Territory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thornton Dial

«Thornton Dial, (born Sept. 10, 1928, Emelle, Ala.—died Jan. 25, 2016, McCalla, Ala.), American artist who created powerfully evocative assemblages, sculptures, collages, paintings, and drawings that reflected his personal history and events in the world. Dial had little formal schooling and did farm work as a child. When he was about 12 years old, he was sent to live with a relative in Bessemer, Ala., and he engaged in a variety of work, including carpentry and house painting, as a teen. He later became a metal worker at the Pullman Standard railroad-car manufacturing plant. Throughout his adult life he created assemblages, which he called “things,” out of found and discarded objects, possibly inspired by similar pieces made and displayed in rural front yards in parts of the South. In 1987 another folk artist, Lonnie Holley, introduced Dial to the collector William Arnett, who was on a mission to find and preserve vernacular African American art. In 1990 an exhibition of Dial’s work, “Thornton Dial: Ladies of the United States,” was mounted by Kennesaw State College (now Kennesaw State University) in Marietta, Ga. Numerous solo and group exhibitions followed, notably the traveling art show “Hard Truths: The Art of Thornton Dial,” which started at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2011 and concluded at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta in 2013. His notable works include the sculpture Lost Cows (2000–01), made from the bones of cattle, and Don’t Matter How Raggly the Flag, It Still Got to Tie Us Together (2003), in which bits of fabric were assembled to take on the appearance of a flag. Collections of Dial’s works were housed in such museums as the American Folk Art Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C.»

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sun Tunnels Nancy Holt

Sun Tunnels is located in the Great Basin Desert outside of the ghost town of Lucin, Utah at 41.303501°N 113.863831°W. The work is a product of Holt’s interest in the great variation of intensity of the sun in the desert compared to the sun in the city.Holt searched for and found a site which was remote and empty.
    «It is a very desolate area, but it is totally accessible, and it can be easily visited, making Sun Tunnels more accessible really than art in museums… A work like Sun Tunnels is always accessible… Eventually, as many people will see Sun Tunnels as would see many works in a city — in a museum anyway.»
The work consists of four massive concrete tunnels (18 feet long and nine feet in diameter), which are arranged in an “X” configuration to total a length of 86 feet (26 m). Each tunnel reacts to the sun differently, aligned with the sunrise, sunset, of the summer or winter solstice. Someone visiting the site would see the tunnels immediately with their contrast to the fairly undifferentiated desert landscape. Approaching the work, which can be seen one to one-and-a-half miles away, the viewer’s perception of space is questioned as the tunnels change views as a product of their landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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